Expert Info

Posted by
on 25 Aug 2011
Trying to decide if I should bring my 2009 Range Rover Sport with me to Zurich. My wife and my two little girls are accompanying me, so it even though I'm aware of the efficient local transport system, it still may be necessary to have private transit. Comments welcome from anyone who's experienced importing a car to Switzerland.
Stephanie on 25 Aug 2011
That's a tough one. The Zurich public transit system is inspiring, and it's even pretty user-friendly for parents with little ones. That said, I understand the need to to just be able to pile the kids in the car and take off. Also, a Range Rover is a pretty big car, and those don't always bode well on the slight European roads and the sardine can parking spaces. It might be best to sell it and buy something more suitable one you arrive.

If you do import you car to Switzerland (I'm going to assume you're coming from the States), you can do so duty free, as the two countries have a free trade aggrement. Hire a company, Schumacher Cargo is pretty good, and they'll bring it across to Rotterdam or Antwerp and then train it down to just near the airport. Depending on where you're coming from it will cost a few thousand USD, probably between 2000 and 4000. You'll also need a few documents to retrieve the car, as well as proof that the car meets Swiss regulations when it comes to construction and engineering. All this should be available on the customs web site.

In a nutshell though, I would say sell your car and buy a new one here if you find you really need it. It will be expensive, and parking will be a problem, regardless though.
Anonymous (not verified) on 26 Aug 2012
If you are coming from north america dont bother... It is extremely complicated and if you do not know the local language you will be tied up in red tape. Cars here are multiples of other countries, but there are services for expats to purchase cars from the eu for a fraction of the price and they handle the importing issues for you, and the adjustment to standards required. Cars especially older than 3 years are a pain to import and it will cause more trouble than its worth. You will still need a vehicle for private weekend travel. I had my car sold back home and then imported a new one from germany by a service provider. It was hassle free and happy i listened to other americans. The trains are good in first class but get very crowded during rush hours and festivals. Opt for a fuel economic car thatyou can manouvre through small streets and parking garages and you will bejust fine.
Anonymous (not verified) on 26 Aug 2012
Parking is not generally a problem if you have a rental space at work and at home. There are parking houses everywhere... It is problematic in residential neighbourhoods, but generally you can find space in blue zones off peak hours

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