Moving to Asia


ASIA

Choose your destination


Afghanistan
Azerbaijan
Flag icon of Brunei
Brunei
Cambodia
China: Beijing, Guangzhou, Shanghai
Flag icon for Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Flag icon for India
India: Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore
Flag icon for Indonesia
Indonesia: Jakarta
Flag icon for Japan
Japan: Tokyo, Osaka
Kazakhstan flag
Kazakhstan
Flag icon for Kyrgyzstan
Kyrgyzstan
Flag icon for Malaysia
Malaysia: Kuala Lumpur
Flag icon for Malaysia
Pakistan
Philippines
Flag icon of Russia
RussiaMoscow
Flag icon of Singapore
Singapore
Flag icon for South Korea
South Korea: Seoul
Tajikistan flag
Tajikistan
Taiwan flag icon
Taiwan: Taipei
Thailand flag icon
Thailand: Bangkok
Uzbekistan
Vietnam Flag icon
Vietnam: Ho Chi Minh City, Hanoi

 

Moving to Asia


Expats moving to Asia will find themselves on a continent that’s as vast as it is varied. The striking regional contrasts and extensive differences in terms of ethnicity, culture, history, economy and environment may surprise many – but as the world’s largest and most populous continent, little else could be expected.

Above all else, Asia is demanding attention primarily for its economic prowess. Both high-profile emerging economies, like India, and long-respected powerhouses, like China and Japan, are attracting expats looking to further their career and land positions associated with lucrative salaries.

Especially in light of a global recession that wreaked havoc in the Western world, the continent’s four impressive financial centres (Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore and Shanghai) and assorted manufacturing and production hubs are beginning to appeal to more and more foreigners.

All things considered, though, expats should be aware that Asia’s opportunities don’t come without certain challenges. Whether planning to move to the suburbs of Delhi, the high-rises of Hong Kong or the ring roads of Beijing, expats will likely be flung into a life in Asia that is very different from that in their homeland.

Complex cultural idiosyncrasies (like the concept of 'saving face'), daunting language barriers, and the constant crush of a nearly claustrophobic populace in the key urban centres can be incredibly disorientating. Not to mention the exorbitantly high and continuously rising cost of living in Asia’s internationally renowned commercial cities.

That said, for every hurdle, there comes the opportunity to get a handle on a new and invigorating aspect of living abroad. Thus, those who can be patient and remain calm during the process of adaptation will be rewarded with life in a region that’s as aromatic and it is aesthetically riveting, as spiritual as it is driven, and as colourful as it is rich.