Sport and fitness in Oslo

Fitness and sport is a Norwegian national pastime. One is likely to see people of all ages, from children on skis to teenagers running to octogenarians on bikes, exercising all around the city. Oslo offers any sport one can think of at gyms, in parks and in Nordmarka, Oslo’s district park.


Competitive sports in Oslo

Favourite Norwegian sports include skiing, running, biking, hiking, football (soccer) and handball. Norway has world-class skiing, football and handball teams. Each sport has a championship or race that every Norwegian either participates in, cheers for or watches on television. Norwegians are very concerned with equality, except when it comes to sports. They are extremely proud of their sports heroes and sports victories. Even historical pride comes into play when it comes to sports.

There are a number of famous international sporting events that take place in Oslo annually. The Birkebeiner is a national institution, with a series of skiing, running and biking races commemorating a political party and an event of national importance involving a former king from the 13th century. Originally a cross-country ski race, the Birkebeinerrennet attracts 16,000 participants each year. The course is 54km (33.5 miles) long. The Birkebeinerrittet is the world’s largest cross-country bicycle race with 17,500 participants. Finally, the Birkebeinerlopet is the largest running race in Norway, with 7,000 participants, covering 13 miles (21km), passing through mountains and forest. Some say that every Norwegian business leader will or should at some point compete in the Birkebeiner.


Skiing in Oslo

In the winter, it is still common to see Norwegians practising sports outside, such as running, hiking, skiing, ice hockey and ice-skating. Kilometres of trails are groomed every week for avid skiers, who leave for the woods right after work, in pitch dark, to hit the floodlit trails. Nordmarka is popular for skiing, and the metro system takes skiers straight to two ski areas in Nordmarka. At any time of the day or night, trails can be crowded with Norwegians skiing in the latest gear.


Jogging in Oslo

For runners, there are other options. Trails crisscross parks and forests. The Oslo marathon attracts thousands of participants and onlookers each September. For less serious runners who enjoy socialising, the Oslo Hash House Harriers run once a week.


Gyms in Oslo

For those who aren’t as keen on being outdoors in the winter, Oslo offers a wide array of gyms for every taste. The biggest chains are SATS and Elixia, and smaller gyms cater to more specific needs. Often companies will have discounts for their employees at these gyms.

Anna Maria Our Expat Expert

Based in Oslo, Norway, Anna Maria is an intercultural trainer and consultant. She focuses on supporting inpats, expats and repats through their transition periods. She has spent 25 years as an expat. She has lived and worked in 17 countries on five continents. Growing up she spent 4-5 years each in the Netherlands, the US, Peru, and Thailand. She travels extensively to keep up friendships, writes for expat online and print publications and is learning to ski to survive the dark winter.

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