Healthcare in Sweden

The system of healthcare in Sweden is widely regarded as being one of the best in the world. The tax-funded system provides equal access to everyone in the country, which has one of the best doctor-to-patient ratios in the world.


Public healthcare in Sweden

The Swedish government invests almost a tenth of its GDP into healthcare every year, providing excellent medical care for all citizens, including expats who have a residence visa. This means that everyone who is a resident in Sweden, no matter their nationality, is entitled to the same medical care that Swedish nationals receive. 

Fees for adults are nominal – among the most affordable in Europe – and medical care is entirely free for those under 20 years of age. The only problem with Sweden’s healthcare system is that there can occasionally be long waiting times before a patient is granted an appointment. However, urgent cases are prioritised and patients are guaranteed an appointment within three days. Non-urgent patients are guaranteed that they will not have to wait longer than seven days for an appointment at a healthcare centre and no longer than 90 days to see a specialist.

Dental care is not included in Sweden’s government healthcare system, but is partially subsidised. 

Expats who would like to benefit from Sweden’s healthcare system will have to apply for a personal identification number (personnummer) at the tax office. Expats who are not EU citizens and have not yet qualified for Swedish residency will have to take out private health insurance to cover their costs. 


Private healthcare in Sweden

Private healthcare is not commonly used in Sweden, but the number of private healthcare facilities in the country has increased in recent years. A small percentage of healthcare in Sweden is funded by county councils but provided by private doctors. Because private healthcare is not affiliated with the Swedish Social Insurance Administration, treatment is more expensive than in public facilities. 


Health insurance in Sweden

Private health insurance in Sweden is rare, although some companies do offer private medical insurance to entice senior level employees. The chief benefit of such insurance is not the quality of healthcare – treatment will be at the same facilities and at the hands of the same doctors as public care – but rather the privilege of circumventing waiting times.

Expats who are not EU citizens should take out private health insurance to ensure that all their medical treatment will be covered. Expats should check with their insurance company in their home country to see if their policy will be valid in Sweden.


Pharmacies in Sweden

Pharmacies in Sweden can be found all around the country and can be identified by the Apoteket sign on the front door. They are usually open from 10am to 6pm on weekdays and from 10am to 2pm on Saturdays. Every large city in Sweden should also have a 24-hour pharmacy for emergencies. 

Expats should note that many medicines which are available over the counter in their home countries may need a prescription in Sweden.


Emergency services 

The number to call in an emergency in Sweden is 112, the European emergency number.

Expat Health Insurance Partners

Aetna Global

Aetna is an award-winning insurance business that provides health benefits to more than 650,000 members worldwide. Their high quality health insurance plans are tailored to meet the individual needs of expats living and working abroad.

Get a quote from Aetna International

Cigna_logo_300.png

Cigna Global

With 86 million customer relationships in over 200 countries, Cigna Global has unrivalled experience in dealing with varied and unique medical situations and delivering high standards of service wherever you live in the world.

Get a quote from Cigna Global