Culture Shock in Vietnam


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Expats moving to Vietnam will need to make some adjustments to their lifestyle and behaviour to take into account the nuances of the local culture, as they would when moving to any new country.

Having an open mind and a sense of humour will certainly help new arrivals to reduce the impact of culture shock in Vietnam.
 

Attitudes towards foreigners in Vietnam


Expats living in Vietnam often find that the attitudes they experience when interacting with Vietnamese co-workers are vastly different to those of market vendors and touts. The Vietnamese people that expats have to deal with on day-to-day basis are warm welcoming and helpful.

However, Vietnam is a popular destination, so there are often times when Western expats find that some local people view them as a combination of an ATM and a performing monkey. Once expats move away from tourist spots they will find they can get a better sense of Vietnam, its people and culture.
 

Politics in Vietnam


New arrivals will soon find that the Vietnamese are very patriotic and it is best not to mention the painful history of the Vietnam War.

Expats will also find it helpful to learn a little about the national history of the country and the significance of its national holidays and associated festivals.
 

Language barrier in Vietnam


While speaking Vietnamese is not a prerequisite for success in the workplace, learning a few basic phrases will certainly hold expats in good stead when it comes to social situations. While Vietnamese is not the easiest language to speak, even a few lessons will help expats when it comes to reading signs and everyday interactions, especially when pronouncing names and places.

The Vietnamese people are very friendly and they appreciate it when foreigners make an effort to speak to them in their own language.
 

City life in Vietnam


The majority of expats who relocate to Vietnam will arrive to the hustle and bustle of cities such as Ho Chi Minh City or Hanoi. At first, some expats might find the vibrancy and non-stop energy of Vietnamese city life overwhelming. Life amongst the touts, vendors, travellers and motorbikes can certainly be noisy, while exhilarating.

Expats also often find themselves the focus of unwanted attention, be it from touts or curious bystanders and children. The best thing to do is just accept the attention and learn to ignore it. Most expats eventually get used to the comments and learn to blend in.

Unfortunately, market vendors are quick to assume that Westerners are wealthy, so expats can expect to find that the prices they are charged tend to be far higher than what the average local would pay for the same goods. However, one should never feel that they have to simply accept the price of an item. When it comes to shopping at markets in Vietnam, everything is open to negotiation. So expats should brush up on their bartering skills.
 

Road safety and transport in Vietnam


One of the major challenges that new arrivals face when moving to Vietnam is getting to grips with the numerous modes of transportation available to them. Buses and trains in Vietnam get incredibly crowded and so do the roads in general during peak hours.

Expats will find that learning how to cross a Vietnamese road full of motorbikes, cars and bicycles is vital. It is best to envision the traffic as a school of fish and cross the road slowly with no sudden movements. This allows drivers to predict a pedestrian's movements and alter theirs accordingly.

Ultimately, expats who approach the chaotic aspects of life in Vietnam with a sense of calm will find that they are more successful. Those who are friendly, open-minded and eager to learn about the Vietnamese people and the local culture will find that their expat experience is far more rewarding. 

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