Frequently Asked Questions about Greece

Moving to a new country is a big step, and expats are bound to have some queries and concerns about their soon-to-be-home. Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about moving to Greece.

Should I move to Greece?

Everybody's circumstances and priorities are different. Greece is not the ideal location to make or save money, but it is a great destination for expats who can afford it and want a slower pace of life.

Can I find work in Greece?

Jobs in Greece are hard to come by, even for Greeks. The easiest way to move over is to go over on a company transfer. Otherwise, most expats working in Greece either teach English or work in the tourism industry.

Do I need a car in Greece?

It depends on where one wants to travel, but expats shouldn't have too much of a problem with transport and driving in Greece.

In the cities, the manoeuvrability of a scooter may be less stressful than a car in the notorious Greek traffic. At the same time, cities like Athens and Thessaloniki have very reliable public bus transport systems.

Moving between cities can be done by bus or, in some cases, by train. Those wanting to make the journey in a low-slung commercial car may have problems travelling on some of the rural roads, although, for the most part, Greece has a highly developed transport infrastructure.

Although the ferries can be unreliable, they are still the best means for moving between islands, though going by plane is also an option. 

Is it worth learning Greek?

Learning Greek is the best way to integrate into society and deal with some of the culture shock in Greece. Aside from having highly specialised expertise, it is also the only realistic way to stand a chance at being competitive in the Greek job market.

With all the strikes and riots in Greece, is it safe to live there?

Most demonstrations are actually peaceful and very few of them occur outside Athens and Thessaloniki. As long as expats avoid areas where protests are taking place, and keep their wits about them, there should be very few issues with safety in Greece.

What's the best way to buy property or rent in Greece?

With help. Real estate is tricky enough when dealing in one's first language, and the best way to avoid a bad deal would be to get help from somebody who can speak Greek. Property prices are quite low as a result of the economy, so there are great opportunities for expats to find good quality accommodation in Greece at a bargain.

Where should I visit?

Aside from mainland Greece, which has its own set of sites and history, there are thousands of islands ranging from large, civilization-bearing islands like Rhodes and Crete, to those that are no more than rocky outcrops. 

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