Navigating local culture in Bulgaria can be an interesting and challenging experience for expats as they immerse themselves in the country's rich history and diverse cultural landscape. The impact of the post-Soviet era, marked by a period of instability, has contributed to the complex tapestry of Bulgarian culture.

The essence of Bulgarian culture lies in its reverence for nature, close-knit family bonds, and a collectivist approach to life. Bulgarian society places great importance on group harmony, often prioritising communal interests over individual desires. Moreover, respecting one's elders is deeply ingrained in the local customs, showcasing the value placed on age and wisdom.

For expats arriving from more developed nations, adapting to Bulgaria's infrastructure could be a bit of a hurdle, as it sometimes requires maintenance and improvements. While progress is being made, the bureaucratic system has a history of issues of inefficiency and corruption. Nonetheless, many expats learn to navigate these challenges, enabling them to embrace Bulgaria's breathtaking landscapes, warm and welcoming people, and budget-friendly lifestyle.


Communication in Bulgaria

Bulgarians tend to be formal and polite upon first meetings. Greetings are often initiated with a handshake, while close friends might kiss each other on the cheek.

Bulgarians are known to be direct and may express their views vividly. Bulgarians also convey much meaning in their hand gestures and facial expressions. Expats may experience some initial confusion, as head shaking in Bulgaria may convey the opposite meaning of what expats might expect. In Bulgaria, nodding the head indicates 'no', while shaking the head indicates 'yes'.


Language barrier in Bulgaria

Although English is increasingly spoken, especially by Bulgaria's younger generations, the majority of Bulgarians don't speak English. Some Bulgarians can speak Russian, French or German, which is advantageous for expats with knowledge of these languages.

Knowing some Bulgarian will be helpful to expats, as many bus drivers, police officers and government officials don't speak English.


Bureaucracy and corruption in Bulgaria

Bulgaria is taking active steps to combat corruption in the public sector, following the EU's recommendations. Nevertheless, corruption persists in various forms, such as civil servants requesting bribes or doctors expecting extra payments for improved care.

Navigating the country's administrative system can be challenging for expats, given its convoluted and inefficient bureaucracy and the differing policies implemented across regions. This can be particularly taxing for those immigrating to Bulgaria or planning to open a business, as a significant amount of paperwork is required.

Expat Health Insurance

Cigna Health Insurance -

Cigna Global Health Insurance.

Medical insurance specifically designed for expats. With Cigna, you won't have to rely on foreign public health care systems, which may not meet your needs. Cigna allows you to speak to a doctor on demand, for consultations or instant advice, wherever you are in the world. They also offer full cancer care across all levels of cover, and settle the cost of treatments directly with the provider.

Get a quote from Cigna Global

Moving Internationally?

Sirelo logo

International Movers. Get Quotes. Compare Prices.

Sirelo has a network of more than 500 international removal companies that can move your furniture and possessions to your new home. By filling in a form, you’ll get up to 5 quotes from recommended movers. This service is free of charge and will help you select an international moving company that suits your needs and budget.

Get your free no-obligation quotes from select removal companies now!