Education and Schools in Jordan

Although Jordan's education system is considered one of the best in the Arab world, the language barrier deters most expat parents from enrolling their children in local public schools. Since classes are taught in Arabic, it can be daunting to propel an expat child into such unfamiliar territory.

That said, very young children are able to adopt a new language much faster than teens or adults. Learning Arabic and growing up alongside local children can help them to assimilate culturally, making public schools a useful for option for those planning to stay in Jordan for the long haul.

For globally mobile families or those with older children or teens,  private international schools are generally the first choice.


Public school in Jordan

Those who are able to enrol their children in Jordanian public school will find that the country's model of education is advanced. Public schools are free to attend and school books are usually also supplied at no cost.

Schooling is divided into primary school and secondary school. Mandatory school attendance is from ages 5 to 15. For all but Christian students, Islamic Studies is a compulsory subject in secondary school.

Once students are 15, they have the option of leaving school or continuing for another two years. If they choose to continue, there are two possible streams to follow: the academic stream, which prepares students for university, or the vocational stream, which prepares students for community colleges or the job market.


International schools in Jordan

Despite the sometimes astronomical price of school fees for international schools, most expat parents choose to take this route. This makes it possible for children to be educated in English, often in a curriculum that is familiar to them. A variety of curricula are on offer, from American, French and British, to the globally recognised International Baccalaureate. This results in as little disruption of the child's education as possible, and the continuity can be reassuring in a situation where so many other things are different and new.

Places at these schools are limited so it is advised that parents start the application process early. Schools might require students to write entry tests and are likely to request reports from previous schools or recommendations. There may also require the child to come into the school for an interview.

Expat Health Insurance Partners

Aetna International

Aetna is an award-winning insurance business that provides health benefits to more than 650,000 members worldwide. Their high quality health insurance plans are tailored to meet the individual needs of expats living and working abroad.

Get a quote from Aetna International

Cigna_logo_300.png

Cigna Global

With 86 million customer relationships in over 200 countries, Cigna Global has unrivalled experience in dealing with varied and unique medical situations and delivering high standards of service wherever you live in the world.

Get a quote from Cigna Global