Areas and Suburbs in Hong Kong

There are a number of popular residential areas for expat accommodation in Hong Kong, each catering to distinct lifestyle preferences. Families with young children tend to favour the southern part of Hong Kong Island, while single expats and young couples prefer the Mid-Levels area. More affluent expats often rent an expensive apartment or a townhouse in the Peak.


Hong Kong Island

Wan Chai

Wan Chai is a cross between a major commercial district and a trendy residential area. It boasts a great selection of hotels, shops, restaurants and entertainment venues, as well as a full range of accommodation types. Rental options in Wan Chai range from budget digs to luxurious serviced apartments. There are many cheap clothing stores to browse in Wan Chai and tasty bargains to be found at the wet markets in the area.

The Mid-Levels

Single expats and young couples in Hong Kong enjoy living in the Mid-Levels, an area just south of Central and Wan Chai, and barely ten minutes' drive from The Peak. This area is popular among young expats due to its close proximity to the city centre's vibrant nightlife. The Mid-Levels is also a good area for expat families as there are good private schools nearby, as well as outdoor attractions such as the Zoological and Botanical Gardens. The extraordinary Central-Mid-Levels Escalator, the world's longest outdoor escalator, runs from here to the city centre. Historical apartments dating back to the colonial era can be found in this area alongside modern, newly built developments.

North Point

Expats looking for more reasonably priced accommodation and a sense of integration with the local population should consider renting in the residential part of this area. Although this neighbourhood doesn’t have any large-scale shopping malls, it does have supermarkets, traditional wet markets and a few good restaurants for expats to enjoy. The well-priced apartments in this area are also generally in good condition.

Repulse Bay

Contrary to its name, Repulse Bay is certainly an attractive area, although some may be put off by the high rental prices. The neighbourhood is inhabited by a number of wealthy Hong Kong businessmen and their families. This is an idyllic location for expat families who are attracted to its pleasant, palm-fringed beach and the close proximity to international schools. Those who live in Repulse Bay will need a car, as there is no MTR stop.

The Peak

Not only is the Peak the highest locale on Hong Kong Island, it is also its most affluent residential area. Height restrictions have ensured that the low-rise buildings don’t detract from the beautiful views, nor do they block any of the cool evening breezes that caress the neighbourhood. Many housing complexes in the area offer communal swimming pools, tennis courts and gymnasiums, and there are also lovely walks to be had in the area. In contrast to Mid-Levels, where high-rise apartment living is the norm, the Peak claims townhouses and single-family homes.

Happy Valley

Happy Valley is an upmarket Hong Kong neighbourhood favoured by many expats, and is most renowned for the famous Happy Valley Racecourse, as well as its close proximity to the shopping and nightlife hub of Causeway Bay. Happy Valley offers a range of accommodation for expats, from classic low-rise complexes to tall, modern apartment buildings. There are also a number of short-term serviced apartments available for expats to rent in Happy Valley. Those who prefer a little quieter and green space, but who’d also like to be close to the energy of the city centre, would do well to find accommodation in this area.

Jardine's Lookout

Jardine’s Lookout is an exclusive residential area located on the mountain above Happy Valley. This area is home to an elite community living in large detached houses and luxurious apartment complexes. Jardine’s Lookout has plenty of useful amenities for expats to use, as well as a beautiful landscape of wooded hills and great views over Victoria Harbour. There are also international schools nearby for the children of expat families to attend.


Kowloon

West Kowloon

Though expats previously regarded the Kowloon peninsula as an inconvenient and less developed place to live, perceptions have changed, and these days many expats are making one of the many high-rise apartments of West Kowloon home. Most of the newer complexes have superb facilities and fantastic communal amenities, but the older apartment blocks will not come so well serviced. Shopping centres abound and the MTR connects to the area, providing a quick commute into town.

Kowloon Tong

Many expat families have also begun to settle in Kowloon Tong as it now plays host to a handful of well-respected international schools. Furthermore, accommodation featuring a rarity in Hong Kong – space – is also more readily available amid its quiet neighbourhoods. Colonial-style houses, low-rise apartments and a smattering of gated communities make up this high-end residential area. Kowloon Tong is serviced by Festival Walk, a ritzy shopping centre, and is connected to the city centre by the MTR.


The New Territories

Sai Kung Town

Sai Kung, a small fishing village, is a popular place for expats and locals alike, and it’s easy to see why people love it. Seafood restaurants line the streets, and the area's many park benches allow viewers to gaze out over the ocean and admire the mountains while watching fishermen sell the day’s catch. Included in Sai Kung is the Sai Kung East Country Park, which is a haven for backpackers, parasailers, hikers, cyclists and campers.

The primary drawback to living in Sai Kung is trying to commute to Hong Kong Island. Sai Kung is not on the MTR line, thus those expats making the daily mission for work will find themselves embroiled in a lengthy process.  

Apart from that fact though, many expats choose to live in Sai Kung for its close proximity to good schools. Additionally, expats often find that the hassle of travelling to work is offset by the cheaper accommodation and greener scenery.

Lantau Island

Lantau Island, an enormous chunk of land, is nearly twice the size of Hong Kong Island and is home to Disneyland, the Hong Kong International Airport and the Lantau South Country Park, the largest country park in Hong Kong. There are also many residential spots on Lantau, including Discovery Bay, a popular place for expats to live.  

Lantau Island is significantly greener than Hong Kong Island, and strict ordinances help curb development and maintain the aesthetic appeal. Even though more commercial ventures and housing projects are present nowadays, the island is still relatively sparsely populated.

Most people living on Lantau Island have to travel off the island for work. Thankfully, it is well-connected to the mainland via the MTR line and by frequent ferry services.

LisaHarvey Our Expat Expert

I’m an American expat who has had the fortune of calling Florida, Massachusetts, New Orleans, Caracas, Nairobi, Abu Dhabi, and now, Hong Kong home.  I have two young children and an amazing husband whose job takes us all over the world. I currently work as an editor for the mental health blog, in addition to hosting a blog of my own, Trifecta Writing Challenge.