Expert Info

Posted by citadeldrive
on 1 Jul 2018

Hi,

My wife and I are discussing the possibility of retiring in Ireland.  I've been researching taxes in Ireland and there are some areas that are vague.

My spouse was granted her Irish Citizenship through her grandmother and will have an Irish Passport. We are both in our 60's, retired, receiving pensions and social security and have no inclination to work.

I have read that Irish residents have to pay tax on income derived from both inside and outside Ireland, while non-residents pay tax only on their income inside the country.

Does that taxable income include pensions and social security from another country?

Thanks,

Mark

Kyle de Villiers on 3 Jul 2018

Hi Mark,

What nationality are you? It'll influence the level of bureaucracy that you'll face.

If you stay in Ireland for more than 183 days a year, then you'll be considered as a 'resident for tax purposes', which means that your pension will be taxed. 

However, if your pension is below certain thresholds, then you either won't be charged or you can apply to be charged a lower rate.

This is from what I've, so it might be worth speaking to a tax/immigration specialist. Otherwise, this Expat Arrivals page on visas in Ireland might be useful to you. 

Best,

Kyle

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