The standard of healthcare in the Czech Republic is generally high – in fact, the country's healthcare scheme has been praised as one of the best in the EU. The affordability and standard of medical treatment have even seen the country emerge as a popular destination for medical tourism in Europe.

It's compulsory to have health insurance in the Czech Republic, whether through a public or private health insurance provider. Czech citizens, residents, and anyone working for a Czech employer are automatically insured under the country's public healthcare system and pay monthly contributions. Other long-term visitors will have to use a private insurance company and short-term travellers are expected to have appropriate travel insurance.


Health insurance in the Czech Republic

The Czech Republic provides free medical treatment to Czech citizens, permanent residents and foreigners working for a local company through a universal healthcare system that uses an approved Czech health insurance company. The largest health insurance company is the state-owned Všeobecná zdravotní pojišťovna (VZP). 

Czech citizens, registered foreign residents and employees of companies based in the country must make regular and compulsory contributions to this fund. It is mandatory for employers to pay a portion of the monthly fee with the employee contributing the remainder of the fee. Under this scheme, expats are also usually required to pay a small co-payment for treatment received.

EU citizens visiting the Czech Republic as tourists can use their European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) to access state healthcare during their visit. UK citizens can make use of their Global Health Insurance Card (GHIC), which replaced the EHIC for UK citizens post-Brexit.

Expats in the Czech Republic who do not have permanent residency and are not employed by a Czech company are not entitled to free medical care. That said, it's still compulsory to have health insurance and expats staying in the country for over 90 days will be required to show proof that they are covered under a private healthcare scheme. In such a case, it's imperative to arrange for private insurance in advance. Those staying in the country for less than 90 days will need to show proof of travel health insurance.


Public healthcare in the Czech Republic

Doctor holding a stethoscope by impulsq

Czech public healthcare is excellent and heavily subsidised, and everyone in the Czech healthcare system receives equal access to care. Many doctors in public hospitals are Western-trained and can speak English, though this is not always the case.

Although the level of care in public hospitals is superb, patients may experience long waiting periods before receiving treatment. Some expats using the public sector have also complained of doctors being short-tempered or unsympathetic, but this is largely due to the high turnover of patients and short consultation times and shouldn't be taken personally.


Private healthcare in the Czech Republic

Czech private medical care is exceptional and the staff at private hospitals are highly trained, with many specialist doctors available. Although private healthcare tends to be pricier than public healthcare in the Czech Republic, many private hospitals are better equipped to cater to expat patients. This is because private medical centres have a higher proportion of English-speaking staff and private clinics have a more service-oriented approach to providing medical care. A further advantage is that patients often do not have to wait as long to receive treatment as they might at public hospitals. 


Pharmacies in the Czech Republic

Pharmacies, some of which can be found attached to hospitals, are widely available in the Czech Republic with some open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Expats should note that prescriptions are only valid for a set period of time. Prescriptions from emergency services expire after two days, antibiotic prescriptions expire after five days, and all other prescriptions expire after two weeks.


Vaccinations for the Czech Republic

Vaccination by Mykenzie Johnson

The Czech Republic is a largely safe country, with minimal health hazards and no required pre-travel vaccinations. Still, it's recommended for expats to ensure that their routine measles and rubella, chickenpox, mumps and polio vaccinations are up-to-date. 


Emergency services in the Czech Republic

Emergency services in the Czech Republic are generally good, as are ambulance response times. In the case of an emergency, dial 112 to be connected to the EU emergency line. This guarantees an English-speaking operator. Otherwise, Czech medical emergency services can be reached at 155.

Expat Health Insurance

Cigna Health Insurance -

Cigna Global Health Insurance.

Medical insurance specifically designed for expats. With Cigna, you won't have to rely on foreign public health care systems, which may not meet your needs. Cigna allows you to speak to a doctor on demand, for consultations or instant advice, wherever you are in the world. They also offer full cancer care across all levels of cover, and settle the cost of treatments directly with the provider.

Get a quote from Cigna Global

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